Posts Tagged ‘Farm’

STUFF: Alpaca Farm Fashion from Adrienne Antonson

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Ok, ok so I know that spring is “here” and summer is on it’s way, but have you been in Oklahoma lately? It’s cold! My baby filled body doesn’t know if it needs to get ready for hibernation or bare feet on the grass.

And then I saw these felted alpaca hats… remember our Everyday Design post featuring the amazingly odd bugs made out of human hair? Well it seems that artist, Adrienne Antonson, is up to more great creative goodness. In between these fantastic felted alpaca hats and the chilly spring I kinda want too crawl back into my winter hole and curl up with a cup of tea (raspberry of course!) and a nice warm fire (comfy house shoes included).

From Farm to Fashion with Adrienne Antonson from Seattle magazine on Vimeo.

After watching this beautiful video about her farm inspired creations she seems like a reasonable person (not someone who would collect human hair and spend hours sculpting them into tiny bugs). And of course I can’t help but be completely intrigued and yet captured by Adrienne’s locally produced clothing line…

“Now, we’ve known that line as NuBe Seattle; but because Antonson has left her digs on Vashon to be closer to family in North Carolina, the line has been renamed State. As Antonson tours with her artwork, she’ll collaborate with other designers, artisans, and friends around the states (hence the name) and scour thrift stores and antique shops for gorgeous threads to put back into premium circulation.” - SeattleMet by Laura Cassidy

So here I am stuck in between winter and summer and enjoying the “cool” Oklahoma spring days for as long we have them! Adrienne I can’t wait to see what else you have up your “remaker” sleeves! Winter or summer I’m definitely figuring out a way to incorporate your wonderful pieces into my wardrobe!

From the (Oklahoma) Farm

All images are from Adrienne Antonson’s Blog. Check it out!

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STUFF: WWOOF – World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms

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If you are someone looking for a real agricultural adventure away from the “main land” WWOOFing maybe just your thing! WWOOF (World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms) is a volunteer organization that connects individuals with organic farmers from around the world! You can choose your location (as long as they have a spot open in the time frame you are available) and spend anywhere from a few weeks to several months helping an organic farm take on their daily tasks.


“WWOOF is a world wide network of organizations – We link volunteers with organic farmers, and help people share more sustainable ways of living.” – WWOOF Website

“WWOOF is an exchange - In return for volunteer help, WWOOF hosts offer food, accommodation and opportunities to learn about organic lifestyles.” – WWOOF Website

“WWOOF organizations -  link people who want to volunteer on organic farms or smallholdings with people who are looking for volunteer help.” - WWOOF Website

Our friend Chelsea spent a summer on an organic farm in Hawaii and shared some of her adventures in our series; Hawaiian Farm Girl. She learned all kinds of things but mainly enjoyed the hands on experience and falling in love with the land.

If you are interested in participating in WWOOFing please know it’s definitely not for the faint at heart! You have to be willing to do chores of all shapes and sizes including cleaning the chicken coop! Not everything is as flashy and pretty as planting seeds but it’s definitely a great experience to learn what it truly takes to run and organize a working farm.

Somethings to consider (from Chelsea’s experience):

CASH ON HAND: As a WWOOFer you are strictly a volunteer so your time is in trade for free lodging and food (whatever the farm grows). You’ll need to make sure you have saved up money to purchase your plane ticket to and from your location as well as any extra spending cash you might want to travel around the area you are saying in.

TRANSPORTATION: If you are wanting to do a lot of site seeing around the area of your farm location you’ll need to consider transportation. Chelsea had access to a car but it was shared among the other WWOOFer’s and it was only available certain days a week.

FRIENDS: Most WWOOFing farms are typically located outside of town and away from other people. You may want to talk a friend into sharing the experience with you so that you don’t get to lonely. Obviously there are other WWOOFers around but you don’t always know their personality types, if they will even speak the same language as you, and how long they plan on staying. You may like the idea of being secluded but others may want to bring a friend! :)

FREE TIME: The farm Chelsea stayed at required each WWOOFer to work 5 hours a day. This may sound like a lot but chores where done quickly leaving a lot of free time to roam the land. Make sure you bring books to read or other things to help you occupy your time. Depending on if you have access to a car or not you maybe confined to the farm grounds a lot more than you would like. Also, don’t forget to ask about internet access, etc. Depending on the farm location access maybe sketchy and hard to keep in touch with family and friends (if you care to do that!).

EQUIPMENT: Find out what type of cooking equipment is available for the WWOOFers. Chelsea was able to take a isobutane/propane stove that was extremely lightweight and compact. It allowed her to fit a single pot, pan, or teakettle at a time to cook a number of things. Since you are typically confined to eating what the farm grows you may want more options when it comes to preparing the same foods over and over again.

With summer quickly approaching WWOOFing is a great hands on agriculture adventure! Not only does it teach you life skills but you’ll gain a better appreciation for the land and what it takes to grow your own food.

Visit WWOOFing today and find out how you can volunteer at an organic farm near you or across the globe!

From the Farm

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A Designer Handy Man

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One of the things that I love about my husband is the fact that he enjoys using his architectural degree as a handy man around our little farm. His design philosophy is one that marries the function of a building with great aesthetics. The longer we are married the more I respect this opinion and see the need for both. When Cale is working on a project, at home or for a friend, he wants to give them a solution that is aesthetically pleasing, money saving, and as efficient as possible. Now, this doesn’t mean he uses “cheap” materials, but when he can, he prefers to use found materials instead of purchasing new. It’s this old school philosophy of using what you have, married with his love for design, that makes him the perfect designer handy man.

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Fresh & Local: Nowakowski Sweet Corn Farm

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Our July Fresh & Local comes a little bit early but I wanted to make sure you had time to take advantage of this seasonal treat (especially for The Fourth)! Last year was my first visit to the Nowakowski Sweet Corn Farm and although it has been a completely insane summer I could not and simply would not miss this yearly opportunity to stock my freezer with fresh sweet corn.

The Nowakowski’s great grand parents originally started in Mcloud, OK in 1948, built a barn in 1951, and were officially established at their current location in 1962. In 1978 they began experimenting with different corn varieties in their garden until they found a favored seed type.

Often called “The Sweet Corn Man”, Greg Nowakowski, is shown with his son Josh and his two grandsons. They help run the family farm from everything to sweet corn, wheat, soy bean, hay, and even a small patch of pumpkins and gords!

The Nowakowski’s own and rent more farm land then they can keep track of. It’s hard to believe that some of the land they have been renting for the past 67 years! Still to this day their “contract” remains the same… an honest word and a good handshake.

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This vs. That: Eggs

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We are what we eat…and so are chickens

Eggs, which ones to buy? There are myriads of choices: farm fresh all natural, brown, cage-free, cage-free organic, etc. What about your local farmer? That’s what we are going to look at briefly…

Some definitions for this comparison: Cage-free: chickens are not confined to a small cage, but instead allowed to walk around and forage for their food. Most ideal is in grassy pasture full of different plants and bugs for food. Sometimes this simply means they are grain-fed in a pen outside of a “hen house;” Organic: meaning the chickens laying the eggs are fed on grass that has not been grown with the use of synthetic pesticides or fertilizers and/or fed some supplemental grain grown in the same fashion;

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Dear Garden Journal…

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It’s true this year for Christmas my intensely insightful and loving sister presented me with my very own garden journal. So here it is, every month I’ll post a unique or abnormally insightful entry from my Garden Journal just for you, and I’ll include a list of To Do items for that month that will help you follow my progress this year. This is my first entry and since winter is still holding it’s terrible grip on all my green friends, I’m looking forward to warmer days and planning for a productive growing season.


STUFF: Chicken Coop Taj Mahal

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So when our friends the Glover’s began construction on what we have christened as the ‘Chicken Taj Mahal’ we were more than excited, we couldn’t wait to see what they came up with and to learn from them as we begin contemplating getting chickens of our own. So with out further ado, and no fan fare at all I give you Chicken Taj Mahal…


Fresh and Local: Kansas Farmers’ Market

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A few weeks ago we we’re able to checkout a Kansas Farmers Market while visiting my family. I was overwhelmed by their great selection of produce, homemade bread, jams, plants, and selection of art. This was one market that truly has all things local.


Nowakowski Farms: Sweet Corn

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If you are from the Midwest you know there is nothing like eating fresh corn on the cob. Marinated with the perfect blend of butter and salt and pepper, it’s the perfect addition to any summer time meal.


High class design in overalls. It's the simple life of a farm through the eyes of a couple of crazy designers. We call ourselves Green Couch Design and we are Bringing Design Home.

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